Last Friday, when I got J ready for bed, I noticed his groin area was dramatically swollen. His penis, testicles…everything down south was swollen. His belly was hard and swollen.

He hadnt urinated in 5 days. I had previously taken him to the ER where they didn’t want to believe me that he hadn’t  peed. So they gave him fluids, I nursed him and they waited for 5 hours to see if he would urinate ; and as I told them he didn’t pee. They did a ultrasound of his bladder he had urine in his bladder, they then catherized him to do a urinanalysis. Which determined he did not have a urinary tract infection. They were stumped as to why he hadn’t peed. Because they kept commenting ” he is visibly hydated”.

I decided to let J sleep a while after his shower to see if the swelling would go down. After a hour the swelling hadn’t gone away. So I packed us up and went to urgent care. From urgent care they sent us to the ER. His groin area was sensitive to touch. He screamed and kicked anytime a person with scrubs came near him. J is ALWAYS HAPPY; which let me know he was in pain and uncomfortable. After we arrived he peed; he soaked thru 3 diapers. He hadnt peed all day…..5 days without urination. He made up for it in a short amount of time.

That nite they did a comprehensive ultrasound of his abdomen; which included his liver, kidneys, pancreas and his testicles. They concluded he had a undescended testicle. They also did a urinanalysis which also came out negative for a UTI.

He has continued to have swelling with discomfort ( doesnt want me to touch them). So, I scheduled a appointment on Wednesday afternoon. On our way to our appointment we were rearended. We were hit pretty hard shook the van and left a abrasion on Sky’s nose from the popsicle hitting him on the nose and breaking. The doctor concluded that both J’s testicles have descended and that he has HYDROCELE.

The testicles of a baby boy actually develop inside the abdomen while he is growing inside the womb. During the third month of pregnancy, an outpouching of the lining that surrounds the inside of the abdomen descends through a tiny canal into the scrotum. This tube paves the way for the testicles to travel down into the scrotum. Once the testicles have reached their final destination in the scrotum, which usually happens just before birth, the tube pinches off near the abdomen.

When fluid is found in the scrotum, it is called a hydrocele. Sometimes when the tube pinches off, it traps some fluid from the abdominal cavity in the scrotum. This is called a non-communicating hydrocele. It is called non-communicating because the tube is closed off from the abdominal cavity. However, sometimes the tube does not completely close off, and fluid from the abdominal cavity is free to flow through this tube into the scrotum. This is called a communicating hydrocele.

Because there is no new fluid coming into a hydrocele that is non-communicating, the body usually absorbs it over the first year of life. A communicating hydrocele will fluctuate in size since the fluid will travel to and from the abdominal cavity. Boys with this type of hydrocele are usually noted to have more fluid in the scrotum while they are upright or active and less while they are lying down asleep.

Up to 50 percent of all boys have some fluid within the scrotum at birth. Hydroceles are not painful, and the fluid from a non-communicating hydrocele may take up to a year to be absorbed. If the hydrocele lasts for more than a year, it implies that it is a communicating hydrocele, and many pediatricians recommend having it surgically closed. This recommendation for surgery is based upon the concern that a hernia may eventually develop.

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